Copper in the Arts

August 2018

Rare Remington Sculptures Gifted to Newark Museum

By Robyn Jasko

The Newark Museum recently announced that two rare Frederic Remington bronze sculptures from the collection of Justice Marie L. Garibaldi of Weehawken have been gifted to the museum permanently.

Remington, who lived from 1861 to 1908 was best known as an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the American Old West, specifically concentrating on images of cowboys, American Indians, and the U.S. Cavalry, among other figures from Western culture.

rattlesnake.jpgFrederic Remington, The Rattlesnake, 1906. Bronze, 23 1/8 x
17 3/4 x 14 1/2 in. Collection of the Newark Museum, Gift from
the Charles A. Serventi Collection, 2017 2017.62.1A-C

Garibaldi, who died in 2016, was the first woman appointed to the New Jersey Supreme Court, and also the first woman to serve as President of the New Jersey Bar Association.

Garibaldi’s 2017 bequest of important bronzes by the sculptor Frederic Remington tripled the Museum’s holdings by this iconic artist of the American West, making this a true showcase of Remington’s life work.

The gifted sculptures include a rare 1906 cast of The Rattlesnake, first modeled by Remington in 1904, and Mountain Man, first modeled by Remington in 1903, and cast in 1916 with permission by the artist’s widow.

Mountain Man was also recently featured in the Newark Museum’s exhibition titled The Rockies and the Alps: Bierstadt, Calame and the Romance of the Mountains in a previous show. The museum is thrilled to make this a permanent part of the collection.

“Each of these works represents a different aspect of Remington’s skilled use of mass and movement to capture what he considered to be the distinctive characteristics of the frontiersman of the American West,” said Ulysses Dietz, the Museum’s Interim Co-Director and Chief Curator Emeritus.

The sculptures were produced by Roman Bronze works, one of the most significant American bronze foundries of the turn of the 20th century established in 1899 by Riccardo Bertelli, a Genoese chemical engineer. The Bertelli family were friends with Charles and Louise Serventi of Weehawken, Garibaldi’s maternal grandparents. It was her grandfather, A. Charles Serventi, who originally collected the Remington sculptures. Garibaldi made this bequest to honor her grandfather’s memory and continue his legacy.

Resources:

Newark Museum, 49 Washington St., Newark, NJ, (973) 596-6550 

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